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Archive for the ‘Eric Thompson’ Category

 

Eric Thomson, also known by the pen-name, Eric Campbell, was a prominent activist, prolific author of articles and racial patriot in the American national liberation movement. He coined the term “ZOG” in 1976 to describe the contemporary situation of government in Western societies. During the “Cold War” he worked for the US secret services in South America. He then spent time in southern Africa with the Rhodesia White People’s Party (alongside Harold Covington and Jeffrey Spencer). Later on, he was an assistant to the famous German-Canadian promoter of revisionist material,  Ernst Zündel, in Canada.

 

Here he talks about his training in International Relations and his growing awareness of the central jewish role in international affairs, the hoax nature of the “Cold War“, and how the “goyim” are asleep. Although he laments that, he sees the spreading of information as being a bit like a “First Aid” kit, there to be used when really needed  — KATANA.

 

 

 

_______________________

 

 

Eric Thompson

 

 

Dear Robert:


 

 

 

Oct, 2000

 

 

Dear Robert:

 

I have spent most of the morning extracting jewspaper items which I hope you will find informative and interesting, as I do. One fellow asked me what I was doing with all the bits and pieces of information, and how I could ever remember it all. I replied that it was easy, for the minor notes fit into the larger theme, as in a kind of monstrous symphony. After a while, one notices the outlines of a big picture, into which the small news items fit like the pieces of a jigsaw puzzle. This is the job of an intelligence analyst. Were I working with real intelligence reports, as a ZOG-nerd for NSA, I would really have to be anti-White to avoid becoming alarmed and despondent.

 

As a student of International Relations, I survived with a score of others, to begin graduate studies in the subject. I.R. is a subject which includes everything, so it is indeed a large subject. Basic tests were on such things as using a terrain map with elevation lines to determine where one would find (a) a deep-water port; (b) a hydroelectric station; (c) a major rail line. Courses included the destabilization and formation of governments, and lots of other information useful to the analyst and/or activist.

 

By way of “welcome” to graduate studies in the field, the head of the department said:

 

So you want to study International Relations on the graduate level.

 

We all nodded in affirmative. He said:

 

Well, there’s one quality you must have, above all others.

 

He paused to let us cogitate. What could it be, we thought, talent in foreign languages, math skills? I’m sure no one, including myself came up with the answer. The professor said:

 

You’ve got to be tough.

 

That surprised everyone. He continued:

 

Because you will be dealing routinely with concepts and information which would send most people, you know, right up the wall.

 

So far, I have found that statement to be true.

 

In regard to intelligence analysis, which all of us do in varying degrees, in our daily lives, he said that the gathering of information is easy, but its analysis into useful categories is not, and still requires human brains because it is a matter of quality, as well as quantity. The analyst must be able to sort the important from the unimportant, and to distinguish false information from true. He said that “there are no big secrets”, but they are so big and so obvious that most people do not see them. Right again!

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