Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for July, 2015

[This autobiography of Henry Ford describes the creation and building of the Ford Motor Company as well as his business philosophy. Ford was one of the world’s greatest industrialists, businessmen, entrepreneurs and visionaries. He introduced the assembly line, reduced working hours, introduced a high minimum wage, the five-day work week, etc., at the beginning of the 20th century. Ford was greatly admired by Adolf Hitler, the driving force behind National Socialism. In turn, Ford became an admirer of Hitler and equally shared his understanding of the menace the world faced with International jewry. — KATANA]

 

Henry Ford - My Life and Work - Cover Ver 2

[Click to enlarge]

 

My Life and Work

 

Henry Ford

 

 

Part 5 

 

IN  COLLABORATION  WITH

SAMUEL  CROWTHER

 

GARDEN CITY                       NEW YORK

DOUBLEDAY,  PAGE  &  COMPANY

 

1923

 

 

CONTENTS

 

 

 

Introduction — What is the Idea? ……………….……………… 1

Chapter I. The Beginning of Business ……………..….………. 21

Chapter II. What I Learned About Business ……………….. 33

Chapter III. Starting the Real Business …………..………….. 47

Chapter IV. The Secret of Manufacturing and Serving .. 64

Chapter V. Getting into Production ……………….…….……… 77

Chapter VI. Machines and Men …………………………..………. 91

Chapter VII. The Terror of the Machine ………….………….. 103

Chapter VIII. Wages …………………………………………..………. 116

Chapter IX. Why Not Always Have Good Business? ……..131

Chapter X. How Cheaply Can Things Be Made? …….……. 141

Chapter XI. Money and Goods …………………………..……….. 156

Chapter XII. Money — Master or Servant? ………….……… 169

Chapter XIII. Why Be Poor? ……………………………..……….. 184

Chapter XIV. The Tractor and Power Farming ..…….…… 195

Chapter XV. Why Charity? …………………………………………. 206

Chapter XVI. The Railroads ………………………………………… 222

Chapter XVII. Things in General ………………………..……….. 234

Chapter XVIII. Democracy and Industry ………..………….. 253

Chapter XIX. What We May Expect …………………..……….. 267

Index ……………………………………………………………..…..……… 285

 

 

 

Chapter IV

 

The Secret of Manufacturing

 

and Serving

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now I am not outlining the career of the Ford Motor Company for any personal reason. I am not saying: “Go thou and do likewise.” What I am trying to emphasize is that the ordinary way of doing business is not the best way. I am coming to the point of my entire departure from the ordinary methods. From this point dates the extraordinary success of the company.

We had been fairly following the custom of the trade. Our automobile was less complex than any other. We had no outside money in the concern. But aside from these two points we did not differ materially from the other automobile companies, excepting that we had been somewhat more successful and had rigidly pursued the policy of taking all cash discounts, putting our profits back into the business, and maintaining a large cash balance. We entered cars in all of the races. We advertised and we pushed our sales. Outside of the simplicity of the construction of the car, our main difference in design was that we made no provision for the purely “pleasure car.” We were just as much a pleasure car as any other car on the market, but we gave no attention to purely luxury features. We would do special work for a buyer, and I suppose that we would have made a special car at a price. We were a prosperous company. We might easily have sat down and said:

Now we have arrived. Let us hold what we have got.

[Page 65]

Indeed, there was some disposition to take this stand. Some of the stockholders were seriously alarmed when our production reached one hundred cars a day. They wanted to do something to stop me from ruining the company, and when I replied to the effect that one hundred cars a day was only a trifle and that I hoped before long to make a thousand a day, they were inexpressibly shocked and I understand seriously contemplated court action. If I had followed the general opinion of my associates I should have kept the business about as it was, put our funds into a fine administration building, tried to make bargains with such competitors as seemed too active, made new designs from time to time to catch the fancy of the public, and generally have passed on into the position of a quiet, respectable citizen with a quiet, respectable business.

The temptation to stop and hang on to what one has is quite natural. I can entirely sympathize with the desire to quit a life of activity and retire to a life of ease. I have never felt the urge myself but I can comprehend what it is — although I think that a man who retires ought entirely to get out of a business. There is a disposition to retire and retain control. It was, however, no part of my plan to do anything of that sort. I regarded our progress merely as an invitation to do more — as an indication that we had reached a place where we might begin to perform a real service. I had been planning every day through these years toward a universal car. The public had given its reactions to the various models. The cars in service, the racing, and the road tests gave excellent guides as to the changes that ought to be made, and even by 1905 I had fairly in mind the specifications of the kind of car I wanted to build. But I lacked the material to give strength without weight. I came across that material almost by accident.

[Page 66]

In 1905 I was at a motor race at Palm Beach. There was a big smash-up and a French car was wrecked. We had entered our “Model K” — the high-powered six. I thought the foreign cars had smaller and better parts than we knew anything about. After the wreck I picked up a little valve strip stem. It was very light and very strong. I asked what it was made of. Nobody knew. I gave the stem to my assistant.

Find out all about this,” I told him. “That is the kind of material we ought to have in our cars.

He found eventually that it was a French steel and that there was vanadium in it. We tried every steel maker in America — not one could make vanadium steel. I sent to England for a man who understood how to make the steel commercially. The next thing was to get a plant to turn it out. That was another problem. Vanadium requires 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit. The ordinary furnace could not go beyond 2,700 degrees. I found a small steel company in Canton, Ohio. I offered to guarantee them against loss if they would run a heat for us. They agreed. The first heat was a failure. Very little vanadium remained in the steel. I had them try again, and the second time the steel came through. Until then we had been forced to be satisfied with steel running between 60,000 and 70,000 pounds tensile strength. With vanadium, the strength went up to 170,000 pounds.

Having vanadium in hand I pulled apart our models and tested in detail to determine what kind of steel was best for every part — whether we wanted a hard steel, a tough steel, or an elastic steel. We, for the first time I think, in the history of any large construction, determined scientifically the exact quality of the steel. As a result we then selected twenty different types of steel for the various steel parts. About ten of these were vanadium. Vanadium was used wherever strength and lightness were required. Of course they are not all the same kind of vanadium steel.

[Page 67]

The other elements vary according to whether the part is to stand hard wear or whether it needs spring — in short, according to what it needs. Before these experiments I believe that not more than four different grades of steel had ever been used in automobile construction. By further experimenting, especially in the direction of heat treating, we have been able still further to increase the strength of the steel and therefore to reduce the weight of the car. In 1910 the French Department of Commerce and Industry took one of our steering spindle connecting rod yokes — selecting it as a vital unit — and tried it against a similar part from what they considered the best French car, and in every test our steel proved the stronger.

The vanadium steel disposed of much of the weight. The other requisites of a universal car I had already worked out and many of them were in practice. The design had to balance. Men die because a part gives out.

Machines wreck themselves because some parts are weaker than others. Therefore, a part of the problem in designing a universal car was to have as nearly as possible all parts of equal strength considering their purpose — to put a motor in a one-horse shay. Also it had to be fool proof. This was difficult because a gasoline motor is essentially a delicate instrument and there is a wonderful opportunity for any one who has a mind that way to mess it up. I adopted this slogan:

When one of my cars breaks down I know I am to blame.

From the day the first motor car appeared on the streets it had to me appeared to be a necessity. It was this knowledge and assurance that led me to build to the one end — a car that would meet the wants of the multitudes. All my efforts were then and still are turned to the production of one car — one model. And, year following year, the pressure was, and still is, to improve and refine and make better, with an increasing reduction in price.

[Page 68]

The universal car had to have these attributes:

 

(1) Quality in material to give service in use. Vanadium steel is the strongest, toughest, and most lasting of steels. It forms the foundation and super-structure of the cars. It is the highest quality steel in this respect in the world, regardless of price.

(2) Simplicity in operation — because the masses are not mechanics.

(3) Power in sufficient quantity.

(4) Absolute reliability — because of the varied uses to which the cars would be put and the variety of roads over which they would travel.

(5) Lightness. With the Ford there are only 7.95 pounds to be carried by each cubic inch of piston displacement. This is one of the reasons why Ford cars are “always going,” wherever and whenever you see them — through sand and mud, through slush, snow, and water, up hills, across fields and roadless plains.

(6) Control — to hold its speed always in hand, calmly and safely meeting every emergency and contingency either in the crowded streets of the city or on dangerous roads. The planetary transmission of the Ford gave this control and anybody could work it. That is the “why” of the saying: “Anybody can drive a Ford.” It can turn around almost anywhere.

(7) The more a motor car weighs, naturally the more fuel and lubricants are used in the driving; the lighter the weight, the lighter the expense of operation. The light weight of the Ford car in its early years was used as an argument against it. Now that is all changed.

 

The design which I settled upon was called “Model T.” The important feature of the new model — which, if it were accepted, as I thought it would be, I intended to make the only model and then start into real production — was its simplicity.

Henry Ford - My Life and Work - Model T Ford 1908

[Image] On October 1, 1908, the first Ford Model T rolled out of the factory on Piquette Avenue in Detroit.

[Page 69]

There were but four constructional units in the car — the power plant, the frame, the front axle, and the rear axle. All of these were easily accessible and they were designed so that no special skill would be required for their repair or replacement. I believed then, although I said very little about it because of the novelty of the idea, that it ought to be possible to have parts so simple and so inexpensive that the menace of expensive hand repair work would be entirely eliminated. The parts could be made so cheaply that it would be less expensive to buy new ones than to have old ones repaired. They could be carried in hardware shops just as nails or bolts are carried. I thought that it was up to me as the designer to make the car so completely simple that no one could fail to understand it.

That works both ways and applies to everything. The less complex an article, the easier it is to make, the cheaper it may be sold, and therefore the greater number may be sold.

It is not necessary to go into the technical details of the construction but perhaps this is as good a place as any to review the various models, because “Model T” was the last of the models and the policy which it brought about took this business out of the ordinary line of business. Application of the same idea would take any business out of the ordinary run.

I designed eight models in all before “Model T.” They were: “Model A,” “Model B,” “Model C,” “Model F,” “Model N,” “Model R,” “Model S,” and “Model K.” Of these, Models “A,” “C,” and “F” had two-cylinder opposed horizontal motors. In “Model A” the motor was at the rear of the driver’s seat. In all of the other models it was in a hood in front. Models “B,” “N,” “R,” and “S” had motors of the four-cylinder vertical type.

[Page 70]

Model K” had six cylinders. “Model A” developed eight horsepower. “Model B” developed twenty-four horsepower with a 4-1/2-inch cylinder and a 5-inch stroke. The highest horsepower was in “Model K,” the six-cylinder car, which developed forty horsepower. The largest cylinders were those of “Model B.” The smallest were in Models “N,” “R,” and “S” which were 3-3/4 inches in diameter with a 3-3/8-inch stroke. “Model T” has a 3-3/4-inch cylinder with a 4-inch stroke. The ignition was by dry batteries in all excepting “Model B,” which had storage batteries, and in “Model K” which had both battery and magneto. In the present model, the magneto is a part of the power plant and is built in. The clutch in the first four models was of the cone type; in the last four and in the present model, of the multiple disc type. The transmission in all of the cars has been planetary. “Model A” had a chain drive. “Model B” had a shaft drive.

The next two models had chain drives. Since then all of the cars have had shaft drives. “Model A” had a 72-inch wheel base. Model “B,” which was an extremely good car, had 92 inches. “Model K” had 120 inches.

Model C” had 78 inches. The others had 84 inches, and the present car has 100 inches. In the first five models all of the equipment was extra. The next three were sold with a partial equipment. The present car is sold with full equipment. Model “A” weighed 1,250 pounds. The lightest cars were Models “N” and “R.

They weighed 1,050 pounds, but they were both runabouts. The heaviest car was the six-cylinder, which weighed 2,000 pounds. The present car weighs 1,200 lbs.

The “Model T” had practically no features which were not contained in some one or other of the previous models. Every detail had been fully tested in practice. There was no guessing as to whether or not it would be a successful model. It had to be. There was no way it could escape being so, for it had not been made in a day.

[Page 71]

It contained all that I was then able to put into a motor car plus the material, which for the first time I was able to obtain. We put out “Model T” for the season 1908-1909.

The company was then five years old. The original factory space had been .28 acre. We had employed an average of 311 people in the first year, built 1,708 cars, and had one branch house. In 1908, the factory space had increased to 2.65 acres and we owned the building. The average number of employees had increased to 1,908. We built 6,181 cars and had fourteen branch houses. It was a prosperous business.

During the season 1908-1909 we continued to make Models “R” and “S,” four-cylinder runabouts and roadsters, the models that had previously been so successful, and which sold at $700 and $750. But “Model T” swept them right out. We sold 10,607 cars — a larger number than any manufacturer had ever sold. The price for the touring car was $850. On the same chassis we mounted a town car at $1,000, a roadster at $825, a coupe at $950, and a landaulet at $950.

This season demonstrated conclusively to me that it was time to put the new policy in force. The salesmen, before I had announced the policy, were spurred by the great sales to think that even greater sales might be had if only we had more models. It is strange how, just as soon as an article becomes successful, somebody starts to think that it would be more successful if only it were different. There is a tendency to keep monkeying with styles and to spoil a good thing by changing it. The salesmen were insistent on increasing the line. They listened to the 5 per cent., the special customers who could say what they wanted, and forgot all about the 95 per cent. who just bought without making any fuss.

[Page 72]

No business can improve unless it pays the closest possible attention to complaints and suggestions. If there is any defect in service then that must be instantly and rigorously investigated, but when the suggestion is only as to style, one has to make sure whether it is not merely a personal whim that is being voiced. Salesmen always want to cater to whims instead of acquiring sufficient knowledge of their product to be able to explain to the customer with the whim that what they have will satisfy his every requirement — that is, of course, provided what they have does satisfy these requirements.

Therefore in 1909 I announced one morning, without any previous warning, that in the future we were going to build only one model, that the model was going to be “Model T,” and that the chassis would be exactly the same for all cars, and I remarked:

Any customer can have a car painted any colour that he wants so long as it is black.

I cannot say that any one agreed with me. The selling people could not of course see the advantages that a single model would bring about in production. More than that, they did not particularly care. They thought that our production was good enough as it was and there was a very decided opinion that lowering the sales price would hurt sales, that the people who wanted quality would be driven away and that there would be none to replace them. There was very little conception of the motor industry. A motor car was still regarded as something in the way of a luxury. The manufacturers did a good deal to spread this idea. Some clever persons invented the name “pleasure car” and the advertising emphasized the pleasure features. The sales people had ground for their objections and particularly when I made the following announcement:

[Page 73]

I will build a motor car for the great multitude. It will be large enough for the family but small enough for the individual to run and care for. It will be constructed of the best materials, by the best men to be hired, after the simplest designs that modern engineering can devise. But it will be so low in price that no man making a good salary will be unable to own one — and enjoy with his family the blessing of hours of pleasure in God’s great open spaces.

This announcement was received not without pleasure. The general comment was:

If Ford does that he will be out of business in six months.

The impression was that a good car could not be built at a low price, and that, anyhow, there was no use in building a low-priced car because only wealthy people were in the market for cars. The 1908-1909 sales of more than ten thousand cars had convinced me that we needed a new factory. We already had a big modern factory — the Piquette Street plant. It was as good as, perhaps a little better than, any automobile factory in the country. But I did not see how it was going to care for the sales and production that were inevitable. So I bought sixty acres at Highland Park, which was then considered away out in the country from Detroit. The amount of ground bought and the plans for a bigger factory than the world has ever seen were opposed. The question was already being asked:

How soon will Ford blow up?

Nobody knows how many thousand times it has been asked since. It is asked only because of the failure to grasp that a principle rather than an individual is at work, and the principle is so simple that it seems mysterious.

For 1909-1910, in order to pay for the new land and buildings, I slightly raised the prices. This is perfectly justifiable and results in a benefit, not an injury, to the purchaser.

[Page 74]

I did exactly the same thing a few years ago — or rather, in that case I did not lower the price as is my annual custom, in order to build the River Rouge plant. The extra money might in each case have been had by borrowing, but then we should have had a continuing charge upon the business and all subsequent cars would have had to bear this charge. The price of all the models was increased $100, with the exception of the roadster, which was increased only $75 and of the landaulet and town car, which were increased $150 and $200 respectively. We sold 18,664 cars, and then for 1910-1911, with the new facilities, I cut the touring car from $950 to $780 and we sold 34,528 cars. That is the beginning of the steady reduction in the price of the cars in the face of ever-increasing cost of materials and ever-higher wages.

Contrast the year 1908 with the year 1911. The factory space increased from 2.65 to 32 acres. The average number of employees from 1,908 to 4,110, and the cars built from a little over six thousand to nearly thirty-five thousand. You will note that men were not employed in proportion to the output.

We were, almost overnight it seems, in great production. How did all this come about?

Simply through the application of an inevitable principle. By the application of intelligently directed power and machinery. In a little dark shop on a side street an old man had laboured for years making axe handles.

Out of seasoned hickory he fashioned them, with the help of a draw shave, a chisel, and a supply of sandpaper. Carefully was each handle weighed and balanced. No two of them were alike. The curve must exactly fit the hand and must conform to the grain of the wood. From dawn until dark the old man laboured.

His average product was eight handles a week, for which he received a dollar and a half each. And often some of these were unsaleable — because the balance was not true.

[Page 75]

To-day you can buy a better axe handle, made by machinery, for a few cents. And you need not worry about the balance. They are all alike — and every one is perfect. Modern methods applied in a big way have not only brought the cost of axe handles down to a fraction of their former cost — but they have immensely improved the product.

It was the application of these same methods to the making of the Ford car that at the very start lowered the price and heightened the quality. We just developed an idea. The nucleus of a business may be an idea. That is, an inventor or a thoughtful workman works out a new and better way to serve some established human need; the idea commends itself, and people want to avail themselves of it. In this way a single individual may prove, through his idea or discovery, the nucleus of a business. But the creation of the body and bulk of that business is shared by everyone who has anything to do with it. No manufacturer can say: “I built this business” — if he has required the help of thousands of men in building it. It is a joint production. Everyone employed in it has contributed something to it. By working and producing they make it possible for the purchasing world to keep coming to that business for the type of service it provides, and thus they help establish a custom, a trade, a habit which supplies them with a livelihood. That is the way our company grew and just how I shall start explaining in the next chapter.

In the meantime, the company had become world-wide. We had branches in London and in Australia. We were shipping to every part of the world, and in England particularly we were beginning to be as well known as in America. The introduction of the car in England was somewhat difficult on account of the failure of the American bicycle. Because the American bicycle had not been suited to English uses it was taken for granted and made a point of by the distributors that no American vehicle could appeal to the British market.

[Page 76]

Two “Model A’s” found their way to England in 1903. The newspapers refused to notice them. The automobile agents refused to take the slightest interest. It was rumoured that the principal components of its manufacture were string and hoop wire and that a buyer would be lucky if it held together for a fortnight! In the first year about a dozen cars in all were used; the second was only a little better. And I may say as to the reliability of that “Model A” that most of them after nearly twenty years are still in some kind of service in England.

In 1905 our agent entered a “Model C” in the Scottish Reliability Trials. In those days reliability runs were more popular in England than motor races. Perhaps there was no inkling that after all an automobile was not merely a toy. The Scottish Trials was over eight hundred miles of hilly, heavy roads. The Ford came through with only one involuntary stop against it. That started the Ford sales in England. In that same year Ford taxicabs were placed in London for the first time. In the next several years the sales began to pick up. The cars went into every endurance and reliability test and won every one of them. The Brighton dealer had ten Fords driven over the South Downs for two days in a kind of steeplechase and every one of them came through. As a result six hundred cars were sold that year. In 1911 Henry Alexander drove a “Model T” to the top of Ben Nevis, 4,600 feet. That year 14,060 cars were sold in England, and it has never since been necessary to stage any kind of a stunt. We eventually opened our own factory at Manchester; at first it was purely an assembling plant. But as the years have gone by we have progressively made more and more of the car.

[Page 76]

 

 

 

____________________________

Version History & Notes

Version 1: Published Aug 1, 2015

__________________

Notes

* Cover image is not in the original document.

__________________

Knowledge is Power in Our Struggle for Racial Survival

(Information that should be shared with as many of our people as possible — do your part to counter Jewish control of the mainstream media — pass it on and spread the word) … Val Koinen at KOINEN’S CORNER

Note: This document is available at:

https://katana17.wordpress.com/

 

 

======================================

 

 

 

Click to go to >>>

Henry Ford — Part 1: Introduction — What is the Idea?

Henry Ford — Part 2: The Beginning of Business

Henry Ford — Part 3: What I Learned About Business

Henry Ford — Part 4: Starting the Real Business

Henry Ford — Part 5: The Secret of Manufacturing and Serving

Henry Ford — Part 6: Getting into Production

Henry Ford — Part 7: Machines and Men

Henry Ford — Part 8: The Terror of the Machine

Henry Ford — Part 9: Wages

Henry Ford — Part 10: Why Not Always Have a Good Business?

Henry Ford — Part 11: How Cheaply Can Things Be Made?

 

 

 

PDF of this postt. Click to view or download (0.8 MB). >> Henry Ford – My Life and Work – Part 5

 

Version History

 

 

 

Version 1: Aug 1, 2015

 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

[Die Autobiographie von Henry Ford die Gründung und Bau der Ford Motor Company sowie seine Unternehmensphilosophie beschreiben. Ford war einer der weltweit größten Industriellen, Geschäftsleute, Unternehmer und Visionäre. Er führte das Fließband, Kurzarbeit, führte eine hohe Mindestlöhne, die Fünf-Tage-Woche, usw., zu Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts. Ford war stark von Adolf Hitler, die treibende Kraft hinter dem Nationalsozialismus zu bewundern. Im Gegenzug wurde Ford ein Bewunderer von Hitler und sein Verständnis für die Bedrohung der Welt mit dem internationalen Judentum konfrontiert zu gleichen Teilen getragen. — KATANA]

Henry Ford - Mein Leben Und Werk - Cover

[Klicken zum Vergrößern]

 

Mein Leben und Werk

 

Henry Ford

 

 

Teil 4 

 

Henry Ford - Mein Leben Und Werk - Portrait

 

 HENRY FORD

MEIN LEBEN UND WERK

EINZIG AUTORISIERTE DEUTSCHE AUSGABE

VON

CURT UND MARGUERITE THESING

ACHTZEHNTE AUFLAGE

PAUL LIST VERLAG LEIPZIG

DRUCK VON HESSE & BECKER, LEIPZIG

1923

 

 

INHALT

Seite

 

Vorwort des Herausgebers  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VI

Einleitung Mein Leitgedanke  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  1

I. Kapitel. Geschäftsanfänge  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . . . . . 25

II. Kapitel. Was ich vom Geschäft erlernte  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

III. Kapitel. Das eigentliche Geschäft beginnt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

IV. Kapitel. Das Geheimnis der Produktion und des Dienens . . . 74

V. Kapitel. Die eigentliche Produktion beginnt  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89

VI. Kapitel. Maschinen und Menschen  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . 106

VII. Kapitel. Der Terror der Maschine  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  120

VIII. Kapitel. Löhne  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135

IX. Kapitel. Warum nicht immer  gute Geschäfte machen?. . . . .153

X. Kapitel. Wie billig lassen sich Waren herstellen? . . . . . . . . . . 165

XI. Kapitel. Geld und Ware  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183

XII. Kapitel. Geld — Herr oder Knecht?  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198

XIII. Kapitel. Warum arm sein?  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .215

XIV. Kapitel. Der Schlepper und elektrisch

betriebene Landwirtschaft  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .228

XV. Kapitel. Warum Wohltätigkeit?  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242

XVI. Kapitel. Die Eisenbahnen  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260

XVII. Kapitel. Von allem Möglichen  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  274

XVIII. Kapitel. Demokratie und Industrie  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  296

XIX. Kapitel. Von künftigen Dingen  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312

VI

 

 

III. KAPITEL

 

 

DAS EIGENTLICHE

 

GESCHÄFT BEGINNT

 

 

 

 

In dem kleinen Ziegelschuppen in Park Place Nr. 8i hatte ich reichlich Gelegenheit, den Plan und auch die Herstellungsverfahren für einen neuen Wagen auszuarbeiten.

Selbst wenn es mir aber gelang, eine Organisation ganz nach meinem Herzen zu schaffen — eine Gesellschaft, die sich die Qualitätsarbeit und die Zufriedenstellung des Publikums als Grundsatz wählte — es war mir doch klar, daß ich niemals ein wirklich erstklassiges und preiswertes Automobil würde herstellen können, solange die halsbrecherischen Produktionsmethoden fortbestanden.

Jeder weiß, daß sich ein und dieselbe Sache das zweitemal besser verrichten läßt als das erstemal. Ich weiß nicht, weshalb die Industrie sich diese grundlegende Tatsache damals nicht zu eigen machte — es sei denn, daß die Fabrikanten es so eilig hatten, einen Verkaufsartikel herzustellen, daß sie sich gar nicht die Zeit zu genügenden Vorbereitungen nahmen. Das Arbeiten ,,auf Bestellung“ statt serienweise ist wahrscheinlich eine Gewohnheit, eine Tradition, die wir noch aus den Tagen des Handwerks übernommen haben. Man frage hundert Leute, wie sie einen bestimmten Artikel ausgeführt zu haben wünschen. Rund achtzig davon werden es nicht wissen und es dem Fabrikanten überlassen. Fünfzehn werden sich verpflichtet fühlen, etwas zu sagen und nur fünf werden berechtigte Gründe und Wünsche anzugeben wissen. Die Fünfundneunzig, die sich aus denen zusammensetzen, die nichts wissen und es zugeben, und denen, die ebenfalls nichts wissen, es aber nicht eingestehen, sind die eigentlichen Abnehmer eines Handelsartikels.

55

Die Fünf, die ihre besonderen Wünsche haben, werden entweder imstande sein, die Spezialarbeit zu bezahlen oder nicht. In ersterem Falle erhalten sie die Arbeit, stellen jedoch nur einen kleinen beschränkten Käuferkreis dar. Von den Fünfundneunzig werden vielleicht zehn oder fünfzehn Qualitätsarbeit bezahlen wollen. Von den übrigen achtet ein Teil nur auf den Preis ohne Rücksicht auf die Qualität. Ihre Zahl wird jedoch immer weniger. Die Käufer fangen an, das Kaufen zu erlernen. Die meisten werden auf die Qualität achten und für jeden Dollar das Bestmögliche an Qualität zu erhandeln suchen. Hat man daher herausgefunden, welche Ware diesen 95% alles in allem die besten Dienste leistet, und die erforderlichen Vorkehrungen getroffen, um hochwertige Produkte zu niedrigstem Preis auf den Markt zu bringen, wird die Nachfrage so groß sein, daß man sie als allgemein bezeichnen kann.

Das bedeutet keine Normung (Standardisierung). Der Ausdruck ,, Normung“ führt zu Mißständen, da er eine gewisse Starrheit von Konstruktion und Durchführung bedeutet, und der Fabrikant zum Schluß meist den Artikel wählt, der am leichtesten und gewinnbringendsten verkäuflich ist. Das Publikum wird weder bei der Konstruktion, noch bei der Preisfestsetzung berücksichtigt. Hinter jeder Normung steckt fast immer der Gedanke, möglichst viel Geld herauszuschlagen. Die Folge ist, daß die aus der Herstellung ein und desselben Artikels unvermeidlich erfolgenden Ersparnisse einen wachsenden Profit für den Fabrikanten ergeben. Die Produktion nimmt zu, — seine Mittel können mehr produzieren, — und ehe er sich’s versieht, ist der Markt mit unverkäuflicher Ware überschwemmt. Die betreffenden Waren wären verkäuflich, wenn der Produzent sich mit einem niedrigeren Preise begnügte. Kaufkraft ist stets vorhanden — aber diese Kaufkraft pflegt nicht immer sofort auf Preisabbau zu reagieren.

56

Wird ein Artikel, der zu teuer verkauft worden ist, infolge Geschäftsstockung plötzlich im Preise herabgesetzt, so ist die Wirkung mitunter so gut wie null. Das hat seinen guten Grund. Die Käufer sind vorsichtig geworden. Sie hallen den Preisabbau für Mache und warten erst auf die eigentliche Preisherabsetzung. Etwas in der Art haben wir letztes Jahr erlebt. Werden die Ersparnisse in der Herstellung aber sofort vom Preise abgezogen und ist der betreffende Produzent für eine solche Preispolitik bekannt, so werden die Käufer zu ihm Vertrauen besitzen und sogleich darauf reagieren. Sie werden es ihm glauben, daß er den ehrlichen Gegenwert dafür gibt. Eine Normung wird daher als ein schlechtes Geschäft erscheinen, wenn Hand in Hand damit nicht eine stetige Preisreduzierung geht. Der Preis muß sogar herabgesetzt werden (es ist überaus wichtig, sich das vor Augen zu halten), weil die Produktionskosten sich vermindert haben, nicht weil die sinkende Nachfrage im Publikum darauf hinweist, daß es mit dem Preise nicht zufrieden ist. Das Publikum sollte sich im Gegenteil ständig darüber wundern, daß es möglich ist, für so wenig Geld so hohen Gegenwert zu geben.

Die Normung (wie ich sie verstehe) bedeutet keineswegs die Auswahl des leichtverkäuflichsten Artikels und seine Herstellung. Sie bedeutet vielmehr eine tagtägliche und jahrelange Untersuchung: erstens des Artikels, der am meisten den Wünschen und Bedürfnissen des Publikums entspricht und zweitens seiner Herstellungsverfahren. Die Einzelheilen des Produktionsprozesses werden sich dann ganz von selbst ergeben. Haben wir die Produktion dann von der Profilbasis auf die Leistungsbasis übertragen, so ist das eigentliche Geschäft gesichert und der Gewinn wird nichts zu wünschen übrig lassen.

All das erscheint mir evident. Es ist die logische Geschäftsbasis für jeden Geschäftsbetrieb, der es sich zum Ziel gesetzt hat, 96° o der Allgemeinheit zu dienen. Es ist der einzig logische Weg für die Allgemeinheil, sich selbst zu bedienen.

57

Ich begreife nicht, weshalb das ganze Geschäftsleben nicht auf eine derartige Basis gestellt ist. All das muß geschehen, um der Gewohnheit Herr zu werden, dem nächstbesten Dollar nachzujagen, als wäre er der einzige Dollar auf der Welt. Wir haben die Gewohnheit bis zu einem gewissen Grade sogar schon überwunden. Sämtliche großen und leistungsfähigen Detailgeschäfte hierzulande haben sich bereits auf die feste Preisbasis gestellt. Der einzige Schritt, der noch zu tun übrig bleibt, ist, den Gedanken der Preisfestsetzung auf Grund dessen, was dem Markte zugemutet werden kann, über Bord zu werfen, und statt dessen die Produktionskosten als die einzig vernünftige Preisbasis zu wählen und diese nach Möglichkeit herabzusetzen. Ist der Konstruktionsplan eines Artikels gründlich ausstudiert worden, so werden Änderungen sich nur sehr selten und in großen Zwischenräumen ergeben, Änderungen im Produktionsverfahren dagegen sehr häufig und ganz von selbst. Das ist zum mindesten unsere Erfahrung in allem, was wir unternommen haben, gewesen. Wie das alles von selbst gekommen ist, werde ich später zeigen. Hier möchte ich lediglich auf die Tatsache hinweisen, daß man sich unmöglich auf ein bestimmtes Produkt konzentrieren kann, ohne ihm nicht zuvor ein unbegrenztes Studium zu widmen. Das Ganze läßt sich nun einmal nicht an einem Nachmittage erledigen.

Diese Gedanken gewannen während meines Experimenlierjahres immer mehr Gestalt. Die meisten Versuche waren dem Bau von Rennwagen gewidmet. Man ging damals von der Voraussetzung aus, daß ein erstklassiger Wagen auch den höchsten Grad von Schnelligkeit entwickeln müßte. Ich persönlich hielt nie viel von diesem Renngedanken, aber die Fabrikanten klammerten sich nun einmal an das Vorbild der Radrennfahrer und glaubten, ein Rennsieg mache das Publikum auf die Güte des Wagens aufmerksam — obgleich ich persönlich mir keine unzuverlässigere Probe vorstellen kann.

58

Da aber die anderen es taten, mußte ich mitmachen. 1905 baute ich mit Tim Copper zusammen zwei Wagen, lediglich auf Fahrtgeschwindigkeit hin. Sie waren einander vollkommen gleich. Der eine wurde „999“, der andere ,,Pfeil“ getauft. Sollte ein Automobil auf seine Schnelligkeit hin bekannt werden, so würde ich eben ein Auto bauen, daß überall dort bekannt werden mußte, wo man auf Schnelligkeit hielt. Die meinigen wurden es. Ich baute vier riesengroße Zylinder mit einer Leistung von insgesamt 80 PS. ein — was für damalige Zeiten unerhört war. Der Lärm, den sie machten, genügte schon, um einen Menschen halb umzubringen. Nur ein Sitz war vorhanden. Ein Menschenleben pro Wagen genügte. Ich probierte die Wagen; Copper probierte sie. Wir gaben ihnen volle Fahrt. Ich kann das Gefühl Flieht so recht beschreiben. Eine Fahrt auf den Niagarafallen wäre daneben eine Vergnügungstour gewesen. Ich wollte die Verantwortung nicht auf mich nehmen, ,,999“, den wir zuerst herausbrachten, laufen zu lassen; Copper auch nicht. Copper sagte aber, er kenne einen Mann, der von Fahrtgeschwindigkeit lebte, nichts könne ihm schnell genug gehen. Er telegraphierte nach Salt Lake City, und es erschien ein Radrennfahrer von Beruf, namens Barney Oldfield. Er hatte noch niemals ein Automobil gefahren, hatte aber Lust, es zu versuchen. Er meinte, er müsse alles einmal ausprobieren.

Wir brauchten nur eine Woche, um ihm das Fahren beizubringen. Der Mann wußte nicht, was Furcht war. Er brauchte nichts weiter zu lernen, als das Ungeheuer zu regieren. Das schnellste moderne Rennauto zu lenken ist nichts, verglichen mit jenem Wagen. Das Steuerrad war damals noch nicht erfunden. Alle bisher von mir erbauten Wagen halten einfach einen Handgriff. An diesem brachte man einen Doppelgriff an, denn es erforderte volle Manneskraft, um den Wagen in der Richtung zu halten. Das Rennen, für das wir arbeiteten, war über fünf Kilometer auf der Great Point – Rennbahn festgesetzt.

59

Unser Wagen war auf der Kennbahn noch unbekannt, und wir ließen die anderen darüber auch im Dunkeln. Die Prophezeiungen überließen wir ihnen gleichfalls. Damals waren die Rennbahnen noch nicht nach wissenschaftlichen Grundsätzen erbaut. Man ahnte nicht, auf welche Schnelligkeit ein Motor es zu bringen vermochte. Niemand wußte besser als Oldfield, was die Motoren zu bedeuten hatten; als er seinen Wagen bestieg, während ich die Kurbel drehte, meinte er gutgelaunt: „Na, die Karre kann ja mein Tod sein, aber wenigstens werden sie sagen, ich sei wie der Deibel gefahren, wenn ich über die Böschung gehe.“

Und er fuhr wie der Deibel ! Er wagte es nicht, sich umzusehen. Er stoppte nicht einmal bei den Kurven. Er ließ den Wagen einfach laufen — und er lief tatsächlich. Er war den anderen zum Schluß ungefähr um Vi Kilometer voraus!

Der „999“ erfüllte seinen Zweck: er zeigte allen, daß ich einen schnellen Wagen bauen konnte. Eine Woche nach dem Rennen wurde die Ford-Automobil-Gesellschaft gegründet. Ich war stellvertretender Vorsitzender, Zeichner, Oberingenieur, Aufseher und Direktor. Das Kapital betrug 100 000 Dollar, und ich war mit 25 1/2% beteiligt. An Bargeld wurden rund 28000 Dollar verausgabt. Das ist das einzige Geld, das die Gesellschaft an Kapital besessen hat mit Ausnahme dessen, was wir aus dem Verkauf der Waren erzielten. Anfangs hielt ich es trotz meiner früheren Erfahrungen für möglich, mit einer Gesellschaft zu arbeiten, an der ich nicht überwiegend beteiligt war. Sehr bald fand ich aber, daß ich die Stimmenmehrheit besitzen müßte, daher kaufte ich 1906 mit meinem Verdienst aus der Gesellschaft genügend Aktien, um mit 51% beteiligt zu sein, die ich kurz darauf auf 58% erhöhte. Die neue Einrichtung und der ganze Ausbau der Gesellschaft wurde aus meinem Verdienst bestritten. 1919 erwarb mein Sohn Edsel die restierenden 41%, weil ein Teil der übrigen Aktieninhaber mit meiner Geschäftspolitik nicht einverstanden war.

60

Er kaufte die betreffenden Anteile zu dem Kurse von 12500 Dollar pro hundert Dollar pari und zahlte dafür alles in allem rund fünfundsiebzig Millionen.

Die ursprüngliche Gesellschaft und ihre Einrichtungen waren ziemlich primitiv. Wir mieteten Strelows Tischlerwerkstatt in Mack Avenue. Beim Entwurf meiner Konstruktionspläne hatte ich auch die Konstruktionsmethoden ausgearbeitet, da wir seinerzeit aber nicht das Geld hatten, um Maschinen zu kaufen, wurde der Wagen als Ganzes zwar nach meinen Entwürfen aber in verschiedenen Fabriken verfertigt, und auch in der Zusammensetzung taten wir wenig mehr, als ihn mit Rädern, Bereifung und Karosserie zu versehen. In Wahrheit wäre diese Art von Fabrikationsmethode die billigste von allen, wenn man sich nur darauf verlassen könnte, daß die Einzelteile auch tatsächlich genau nach den von mir oben näher ausgeführten Produktionsmethoden hergestellt würden. Die sparsamste aller Produktionsmethoden wird in Zukunft die sein, bei der die Gesamtartikel nicht unter ein und demselben Dach hergestellt werden — es sei denn natürlich, daß der betreffende Artikel ganz einfach ist. Die moderne oder vielmehr künftige Methode wird darin bestehen, daß man jeden einzelnen Teil dort, wo er am besten fabriziert wird, herstellen läßt, und sie dann in den Verbrauchszentren zusammensetzt. Es ist die Methode, die wir jetzt schon befolgen und noch zu erweitern beabsichtigen. Dabei wäre es ganz gleich, ob ein und dieselbe Gesellschaft oder ein und derselbe Inhalier sämtliche Fabriken besäße, die die Einzelteile des fertigen Produktes herstellen, oder ob die einzelnen Teile in voneinander ganz unabhängigen Fabriken verfertigt werden, vorausgesetzt, daß sämtliche Fabriken dasPrinzip der Dienstleistung angenommen haben. Können wir die einzelnen Teile in der gleichen Güte kaufen, wie wir sie herzustellen vermögen, und sind reichliche Vorräte zu angemessenen Preisen vorhanden, so machen wir keinen Versuch, sie selbst herzustellen — außer um im Notfall einige bei der Hand zu haben. In Wahrheit wäre es vielleicht sogar besser, wenn die Besitzer verschiedene Personen wären.

61

Ich hatte in der Hauptsache mit der Gewichtsverminderung experimentiert.Gewichtsüberschuß ist der Tod jedes Selbstfahrers. Es herrschen die törichtsten Vorstellungen über Gewichtsfragen. Aus irgendeinem unklaren Grunde haben wir gelernt, Gewicht mit Kraft zu verwechseln. Die primitiven Konstruktionsmethoden der Vergangenheit sind zweifellos an vielem schuld. Der alte Ochsenwagen wog ungefähr hundert Zentner — sein Gewicht war so groß, daß seine Zugkraft nur gering war. Um einige hundert Zentner menschliches Gewicht von Neuyork nach Chicago zu befördern, bauen die Eisenbahnen einen Zug, der viele Tonnen wiegt. Die Folge ist eine Vergeudung an Zugkraft und ein unerhörter an ungezählte Millionen grenzender Verlust von Energie. Das Gesetz des verringerten Wirkungsgrades setzt an dem Punkte ein, wo Kraft sich zu Gewicht verwandelt. Gewicht ist vielleicht bei einer Dampfwalze erstrebenswert, sonst aber nirgends. Kraft hat mit Gewicht nichts zu tun. Die Mentalität eines Mannes, der etwas in der Welt leistet, ist im Gegenteil beweglich, leichtund stark. Die schönsten Dinge in der Welt sind solche, die jedes Gewichtsüberschusses enthoben sind. Kraft ist niemals reines Gewicht — weder beim Menschen noch bei den Dingen. Wann immer mir jemand vorschlägt, das Gewicht zu vermehren oder einen Teil hinzuzufügen, so versuche ich im Gegenteil, das Gewicht zu verringern und einen Teil zu eliminieren! Der von mir entworfene Wagen war leichter als alle bisherigen. Er wäre noch leichter geworden, hätte ich gewußt, wie ich es anstellen sollte — später verschaffte ich mir das Material für einen noch leichteren Wagen.

62

In. ersten Jahre bauten wir das ,,Modell A“, wobei wir das Chassis für 85o Dollar und die Karosserie für weitere 100 Dollar auf den Markt brachten. Dieses Modell besaß einen Zweizylinder-Motor von acht Pferdestärken und ein Kettengetriebe. Der Brennstoffbehälter faßte zwanzig Liter. Unser Absatz in jenem ersten Jahr betrug 1708 Wagen, so groß war der Anklang, den sie fanden.

Jeder einzelne dieser ,,Modell A“ – Wagen hat seine Geschichte. Da ist z. B. Nr. 420. 1904 wurde er von Oberst D. C. Collier aus Kalifornien erworben. Er fuhr ihn einige Jahre, verkaufte ihn und erstand einen neuen Ford. Nr. 420 wanderte von einer Hand zur andern, bis er im Jahre 1907 in die Hände eines gewissen Edmund Jacobs gelangte, der in Kamona, im Herzen der Berge, ansässig war. Dieser benutzte den Wagen einige Jahre lang zu den schwierigsten Fahrten. Dann kaufte er sich einen neuen Ford und verkaufte den alten. 1916 war Nr. 420 in den Besitz eines gewissen Cantello übergegangen, der den Motor herausnahm, ihn zum Antrieb einer Wasserpumpe benutzte und das Chassis mit Stützen versah, so daß der Motor zur Zeit lustig Wasser pumpt, während das Chassis mit einem Maulesel als Vorspann die Bolle eines Bauernwagens spielt. Die Moral des Ganzen lautet natürlich: Du kannst einen Ford auseinandernehmen, aber nicht umbringen.

In unserer ersten Reklame heißt es:

,,Zweck unserer Arbeit ist, ein Automobil speziell für den Alltagsgebrauch und Alltagsnutzen, zu geschäftlichen, beruflicher! und Erholungszwecken für die Familie zu bauen und auf den Markt zu bringen; ein Automobil, das genügend Schnelligkeit aufzubringen vermag, um den Durchschnittsfahrer vollauf zu befriedigen, ohne indes die halsbrecherischen Fahrtgeschwindigkeiten zu erreichen, die heute so allgemein verurteilt werden, einen Wagen, der von allen Männern, Frauen und Kindern gleichmäßig um seiner Stabilität, Einfachheit, Sicherheit, praktischer Bequemlichkeit und — last not least — seines außerordentlich mäßigen Preises willen bewundert wird, — bei einem Preise, der ihm einen vieltausendköpfigen Käuferkreis erschließen wird, welcher niemals halte daran denken können, die schwindelohaften Preise zu zahlen, die für die meisten Wagen verlangt werden.“

63

Die folgenden Punkte hoben wir besonders hervor:

Güte des Materials.

Einfachheit der Konstruktion. Die meisten Wagen stellten damals ziemliche Ansprüche an die Geschicklichkeit des Führers.

Güte des Motors.

Zuverlässigkeit der Zündung, die durch eine Doppelreihe von je sechs Trockenelementen garantiert war.

Selbsttätige Schmierung.

Einfachheit und Lenkbarkeit des Planetengetriebes.

Güte der Ausführung.

Wir wandten uns nicht an den Vergnügungssinn des Publikums. Das haben wir niemals getan. Bei unserer ersten Reklame wiesen wir bereits auf den Nutzen eines Automobils hin. Wir sagten:

,,Wie oft hören wir das alte Wort, Zeit ist Geld — und doch wie wenig Geschäftsleute und Berufsmenschen handeln, als glaubten sie tatsächlich an seine Richtigkeit.

Männer, die fortgesetzt über Zeitmangel jammern und sich darüber beklagen, daß die Woche so wenig Tage hat — Männer, die für jede fünf Minuten, die sie verlieren, einen Dollar zum Fenster hinauswerfen — Männer, für die fünf Minuten Aufschub mitunter den Verlust vieler Dollar bedeutet — verlassen sich trotzdem auf die zufälligen, unbequemen mid mitunter mangelhaften Verkehrsverbindungen, die uns die Straßenbahn usw. bietet, während die Investierung einer außerordentlich bescheidenen Summe in den Ankauf eines tadellosen, leistungsfähigen, hochwertigen Automobils sie jeder Sorge und Unpünktlichkeit enthebt, und sie mit einem luxuriösen, stets ihres Winkes harrenden Transportmittel versieht.

64

Stets bereit, stets sicher.

Gebaut, um Ihnen Zeit und Geld zu sparen.

Gebaut, um Sie überall hinzuführen, wo Sie sein möchten, und Sie zur rechten Zeit zurückzubringen.

Gebaut, um Ihren Ruf für Pünktlichkeit zu verbessern, um Sie bei guter Laune und in Kaufstimmung zu halten.

Gebaut für Geschäfts- und Vergnügungszwecke, ganz nach Ihrem Belieben.

Gebaut auch für Gesundheitszwecke, — um Sie ,reibungslos‘ über halbwegs anständige Wege zu befördern, Ihr Gehirn durch den Genuß eines langen Aufenthaltes im Freien und Ihre Lungen durch das , Mittel aller Mittel’ — die richtige Art von Luft aufzufrischen.

Sie sind auch Herr über die Geschwindigkeit. Sie können — wenn Sie wollen — langsam durch schattige Alleen gleiten, oder Sie können den Gashebel mit ihrem Fuße herunterdrücken, bis die ganze Landschaft um Sie herum verschwimmt und Sie die Augen aufreißen müssen, um die Meilensteine. am Wege zu zählen.“

Ich gebe nur den eigentlichen Kern dieser Reklame, um zu beweisen, daß wir von Anfang an etwas Nützliches schaffen wollten — niemals haben wir uns mit einem ,,Sportwagen“ abgegeben.

Das Geschäft ging wie durch Zauber. Unsere Wagen gewannen großen Ruf als leistungsfähig. Sie waren widerstandsfähig, einfach und gut gearbeitet. Ich arbeitete an meinem Entwurf für ein einfaches und grundlegendes Modell, aber es war noch nicht fertig, und wir hatten auch nicht das Gold, um eine passende Fabrik zu bauen und einzurichten. Wir waren immer noch gezwungen, das Material zu verwenden, das der Markt uns bot — wir kauften zwar das Beste, was es gab, aber uns standen keine Mittel zur wissenschaftlichen Prüfung des Materials und zu eigner Forschung zur Verfügung.

65

Meine Associes waren nicht überzeugt, daß unsere Wagen sich auf ein einziges Modell beschränken ließen. Die Automobilindustrie hatte sich die Fahrradindustrie zum Vorbild gewählt, in der jeder Fabrikant sich verpflichtet fühlte, alljährlich ein neues Modell herauszubringen und es allen bisherigen Modellen so ungleich zu machen, daß die Besitzer der alten Typen ihre Räder gegen neue umzutauschen wünschten. Das galt als tüchtige Geschäftsführung. Der gleichen Idee huldigen die Frauen in bezug auf Kleider und Hüte. Dieser Gedanke geht indes nicht von der Dienstleistung aus, sondern lediglich von dem Wunsch, etwas Neues, nicht etwas Besseres zu schaffen. Es ist erstaunlich, wie festgewurzelt der Glaube ist, daß ein flottes Geschäft — ein ständiger Warenumsatz — nicht davon abhängt, den Kunden ein für allemal zufrieden zu stellen, sondern ihn zuerst dazu zu verleiten, für einen bestimmten Artikel Geld auszugeben und ihn dann davon zu überzeugen, daß er einen anderen neuen Artikel kaufen muß. Der Plan, mit dem ich mich damals trug, für den wir aber noch nicht reif genug waren, um ihn in die Tat umzusetzen, war, ein bestimmtes Modell zu bauen, bei dem jeder einzelne Teil herausgenommen und durch einen eventuell künftig vervollkommneten Teil ersetzt werden konnte, so daß ein Wagen niemals veraltete. Es ist mein Ehrgeiz, jeden Maschinenteil, jeden Dauerartikel, den ich herausbringe, so stark und gut zu arbeiten, daß niemand ihn von rechtswegen zu ersetzen braucht. Jede gute Maschine müßte eigentlich so dauerhaft sein wie eine gute Uhr.

Im zweiten Produktionsjahr richteten wir unsere Energie auf zwei verschiedene Modelle. Wir brachten einen Verzylinder-Touren wagen, ,,Modell B“, für zweitausend Dollar heraus; ,,Modell C“, ein etwas vervollkommneteres Modell ,,A“ für fünfzig Dollar mehr als den ursprünglichen Preis, und ,,Modell F“, einen Tonrenwagen für tausend Dollar. Wir zersplitterten unsere Energie und erhöhten die Preise — die Folge war, daß wir weniger Wagen als im Jahr vorher, nämlich nur 1696 Stück verkauften.

66

,,Modell B“ — der Vierzylinderwagen für allgemeine Tourenzwecke — mußte bekannt gemacht werden. Ein Rennsieg oder ein Kekordbruch war damals die beste Reklame. Daher möbelte ich den ,,Pfeil“, den Zwillingsbruder unseres alten ,,Modell A“ auf — d.h. eigentlich baute ich einen ganz neuen Wagen — und acht Tage vor der Neuyorker Automobil-Ausstellung lenkte ich ihn selbst über eine abgesteckte Strecke von 1600 Metern quer über das Eis. Niemals werde ich die Fahrt vergessen! Das Eis schien ganz glatt, so glatt, daß wir, hätte ich die Probefahrt abgesagt, einen fetten Bissen der unrichtigen Art von Reklame geschluckt haben werden. Aber trotz dieser scheinbaren Glätte war die ganze Eisfläche von Rissen und Spalten durchzogen, die mir, wie ich wußte, in dem Moment, wo ich dem Wagen Vollgas gab, allerlei zu schaffen machen würden. Es blieb mir aber nichts übrig, als die Probefahrt zu machen, und so ließ ich denn dem alten ,,Pfeil“ die Zügel schießen! Bei jedem Spalt machte der Wagen einen Luftsprung. Ich wußte nie, wo ich wieder landen würde. Wenn ich mich nicht in der Luft befand, schleuderte ich nach rechts und links; aber auf irgendeine rätselhafte Weise gelang es mir, mit der richtigen Seite nach oben und auf der Rennbahn zu bleiben. Ich erzielte einen Rekord, der in der ganzen Welt bekannt wurde! Damit war ,, Modell B“ durch, aber nicht so durch, um den höheren Preis zu schlagen. Keine noch so abenteuerliche Leistung und Reklame genügt, um auf die Dauer einen Artikel durchzusetzen. Das Geschäft ist kein Sport. Die Moral steht noch aus.

Unsere kleine hölzerne Werkstatt war bei unserm steigenden Umsatz völlig unzulänglich geworden. 1906 entnahmen wir daher unserm Betriebskapital die nötigen Mittel, um an der Ecke von Piquett- und Beaubrien Street ein dreistöckiges Fabrikgebäude aufzuführen, wodurch wir zum erstenmal in den Besitz richtiger Produktionsmittel gelangten.

67

Wir fingen jetzt an, eine ganze Reihe von Teilen selbst zu bauen und zusammenzustellen; in der Hauptsache blieben wir freilich auch weiter ein Betrieb für den Zusammenbau von Automobilen. 1906/07 brachten wir nur zwei Modelle heraus — den Vierzylinderwagen für zweitausend Dollar und einen Tourenwagen für tausend Dollar, deren Entwürfe beide in das Jahr vorher fielen — trotzdem sank unser Umsatz auf 1599 Wagen herab.

Einige behaupteten, es läge daran, daß wir keine neuen Modelle herausbrächten. Ich glaubte, der Grund läge in den zu hohen Preisen — sie waren nichts für die 95%! Im nächsten Jahre änderte ich daher unsere Geschäftstaktik — nachdem ich die Aktienmajorität erworben halte. 1906/07 verzichteten wir gänzlich auf die Herstellung von Luxusautomobilen und brachten statt dessen drei Modelle von kleinen Stadtautomobilen und leichten Tourenwagen heraus, die sowohl in ihrem Herstellungsverfahren wie in ihren Teilen von den andern nicht wesentlich verschieden, waren und nur in der äußeren Gestalt von ihnen abwichen. Die Hauptsache aber war, daß unser billigster Wagen nur sechshundert Dollar und unser teuerster nicht über siebenhundertfünfzig Dollar kostete; und im Handumdrehen war erwiesen, was der Preisfaktor bedeutete! Wir verkauften nicht weniger als 8423 Wagen — fast fünfmal so viel als in unserm besten Geschäftsjahr. Unser Rekord fiel in die Woche zum 15. Mai 1908, in der wir in sechs Arbeitstagen 311 Wagen montierten. Es war fast mehr, als wir leisten konnten. Der Vorarbeiter halle eine schwarze Tafel, auf der er jeden Wagen mit Kreide vermerkte, ehe er zur Probefahrt freigegeben wurde. Es war kaum Platz genug auf der Tafel. An einem Tage in dem darauf folgenden Juni gelangten rund 100 Wagen bei uns zur Montage.

68

Im nächsten Jahr wichen wir etwas von dem mit so großem Erfolg durchgeführten Programm ab. Ich baute einen großen Wagen — einen Sechszylindrigen von fünfzig Pferdekräften — der die Landstraßen nur so verschlingen sollte. Zwar fuhren wir fort, unsere kleinen Wagen herauszubringen, aber die Panik von 1907 und unsere Extratour mit dem teuren Modell drückte den Umsatz auf 6898 Wagen herab.

Wir hatten eine Experimentierzeit von fünf Jahren hinter uns. Die Wagen fingen an, in Europa Verbreitung zu finden. Unser Unternehmen galt für eine Automobilfabrik als außerordentlich erfolgreich. Wir hatten reichlich Geld. Mit Ausnahme des ersten Jahres waren wir eigentlich nie in Verlegenheit. Wir verkauften nur gegen bar, liehen kein Geld aus und vermieden den Zwischenhandel. Wir hatten keine drückenden Schulden und hielten uns innerhalb unserer Grenzen. Wir haben uns eigentlich nie übernommen. Ich bin niemals gezwungen gewesen, meine Geldmittel zu strecken, denn wenn man sein ganzes Streben auf nutzbringende Arbeit richtet, so wachsen die Hilfsmittel rascher aJs man Möglichkeiten zu ihrer Verwendung ersinnen kann.

Wir gingen bei der Auswahl unserer Verkäufer vorsichtig zu Werk. Anfangs war es sehr schwer, wirklich gute Verkäufer aufzutreiben, da das Automobilgeschäft nicht als solide galt. Es galt als ein Luxusgeschäft — als ein Vertrieb von Vergnügungswagen. Schließlich beauftragten wir eine Reihe von Agenten mit dem Vertrieb, wobei wir die besten auswählten, die es gab und ihnen ein Gehalt zahlten, das den Verdienst, den sie bestenfalls für sich aus dem Geschäft herausschlagen konnten, um vieles übertraf. Anfänglich waren die Gehälter bei uns nicht besonders hoch. Wir hatten ja kaum begonnen, uns zurechtzufinden; als wir uns aber auskannten, machten wir es zu unserm Prinzip, jede Leistung denkbar hoch zu entlohnen, dafür aber auch auf nur erstklassigen Leistungen zu bestehen. Von unsern Agenten forderten wir als Grundbedingung:

69

1. Fortschrittliche Gesinnung und alle Eigenschaften, die zu einem modernen, tüchtigen, aufgeweckten Geschäftsmann gehören.

2. Ein ausreichendes Lager von Ersatzteilen, um Reparaturen rasch ausführen zu können und sämtliche Fordwagen des Bezirks gebrauchsfähig zu erhalten.

3. Ein passendes, sauberes und unser würdiges Geschäftslokal.

4. Eine entsprechende Reparaturwerkstatt mit sämtlichen, zu jeder Art von Reparaturen und Instandhaltung erforderlichen Maschinen.

5. Mechaniker, die den Bau und Betrieb von Fordwagen von Grund auf kannten.

6. Eine gründliche und umfassende Buchhaltung und Registratur, aus der die Bilanzen der verschiedenen Geschäftsabteilungen, der Zustand und Umfang des Lagers, die Namen der jeweiligen Fordbesitzer und die Zukunftsaussichten sofort ersichtlich waren.

7. Absolute Sauberkeit in jeder Abteilung; ungeputzte Fensterscheiben, staubige Möbel, schmutzige Fußböden wurden nicht geduldet.

8. Ein passendes Aushängeschild.

9. Eine Geschäftstaktik, die absolut faire Geschäftsmethoden und die höchste Art von Geschäftsmoral garantierte.

Unsere grundlegenden Instruktionen lauteten:

,,Ein Händler oder Kaufmann sollte die Namen sämtlicher Einwohner seines Bezirks, die als Automobilkäufer in Betracht kommen, kennen, einschließlich all derer, die der ganzen Frage noch nie einen Gedanken gewidmet haben. Alsdann sollte er jeden Einzelnen womöglich durch persönlichen Besuch — mindestens aber brieflich — heranzuziehen suchen, um mit Hilfe der erforderlichen Notizen die Beziehungen eines jeden Einwohners zum Automobil zu erforschen. Ist es Ihnen nicht möglich, etwas derartiges in Ihrem Bezirk durchzuführen, so ist Ihr Bezirk eben zu groß.“

70

Der Weg war trotz alledem nicht leicht. Wir wurden durch einen Riesenprozeß gehemmt, der gegen die Gesellschaft angestrengt war, um sie zu zwingen, sich einer Vereinigung der Automobilindustriellen anzuschließen, die von der falschen Voraussetzung ausgingen, daß der Markt für Automobile beschränkt sei und eine Monopolisierung erforderlich mache. Das war der berühmte Seidenprozeß. Zeitweise bedeuteten die Kosten für die Verteidigung für uns eine arge Belastung. Der erst kürzlich verstorbene Mr. Seiden hatte wenig mit diesem Prozeß zu tun. Er war lediglich das Werk des Trusts, der mit Hilfe des Patents ein Monopol zu erzwingen suchte. Die Lage war folgende:

George B. Seiden, ein Patentanwalt, hatte bereits im Jahre 1879 ein Patent eingebracht mit dem erklärten Zweck:

,,Eine sichere, einfache und billige Straßenlokomotive zu bauen, die nicht viel wiegen, leicht zu bedienen sein und hinreichende Kraftleistung aufweisen sollte, um eine Durchschnittssteigung zu überwinden.“

Dieser Antrag wurde auf absolut gesetzlichem Wege beim Patentamt auf dem Laufenden erhalten, bis im Jahre 1895 das Patent bewilligt wurde, 1879, bei der Stellung des Antrages, war das Automobil in der breiteren Öffentlichkeit so gut wie unbekannt, bei der Gewährung des Patents waren Selbstfahrer aber längst eingeführt, und die meisten Techniker, wie z.B. auch ich, die sich seit Jahren mit dem Problem der motorischen Fortbewegung befaßten, mußten eines schönen Tages zu ihrer Überraschung entdecken, daß die von ihnen durchgeführte praktische Lösung von einem viele Jahre zurückliegenden Patentantrag geschützt war, obgleich der Antragsteller seine Idee nur als Idee hatte fortbestehen lassen. Er hatte nichts getan, um sie in die Praxis umzusetzen.

Die auf Grund des Patents erhobenen Ansprüche ließen sich in sechs Gruppen einteilen, von denen meiner Ansicht nach keine einen Gedanken enthält, der selbst im Jahre 1879 das Recht auf Neuheit hätte beanspruchen können.

71

Das Patentamt erkannte eine Art Kombination an und erteilte ein sogenanntes „Kombinationspatent“ mit der Bestimmung, daß die Verbindung von (a) einem Wagen mit Rumpfmaschinerie und Steuerrad mit (b) Hebelmechanismus und Getriebe für die Fortbewegung und (c) dem Motor selbst ein gültiges Patent darstellten.

Mit alledem hatten wir nichts zu tun. Ich war fest überzeugt, daß meine Maschine nichts mit dem, was Seiden vorschwebte, zu tun hatte. Die mächtige Gruppe von Industriellen jedoch, die sich als die ,, autorisierten Hersteller“ bezeichneten, weil sie mit der Autorisation des Patentinhabers arbeiteten, strengten eine Klage gegen uns an, sobald wir angefangen hatten, in der Automobilindustrie eine Rolle zu spielen. Der Prozeß schleppte sich hin. Er sollte uns vor lauter Schrecken aus dem Geschäft jagen. Wir brachten ganze Bände von Beweisen zusammen und am i5. September 1909 fiel der große Schlag. Richter Hough vom United States. District Court fällte ein Urteil gegen uns. Sofort setzte die autorisierte Vereinigung mit einer Propaganda ein, die alle zukünftigen Käufer unseres Wagens vor uns warnte. Das Gleiche hatte sie bereits 1908 bei Prozeßbeginn getan, als sie glaubte, uns das Handwerk legen zu können. Ich war felsenfest davon überzeugt, daß wir den Prozeß gewinnen würden. Ich wußte einfach, daß wir im Recht waren; trotzdem bedeutete es für uns einen ziemlichen Schlag, in erster Instanz verloren zu haben, weil wir fürchteten, daß zahlreiche Käufer — obwohl kein Produktionsverbot gegen uns bestand — sich durch Androhung von gerichtlichen Maßnahmen gegen die einzelnen Besitzer der Fordwagen vom Kaufe würden abschrecken lassen. Man streute das Gerücht aus, daß man für den Fall einer für uns ungünstigen Entscheidung jeden Fordwagenbesitzer gerichtlich belangen lassen würde. Einige meiner heftigsten Gegner ließen, so viel ich weiß, privatim durchblicken, daß es sogar zu einem kriminellen Verfahren kommen würde, und dalj jeder, der sich einen Fordwagen erstände, sich ebensogut einen Haftbefeld kaufen könnte.

72

Wir machten mit einer Anzeige dagegen Front, die vier Seiten der wichtigsten Tageszeitungen unseres Landes beanspruchte. Wir setzten unsern Fall — unsern Glauben an den endgültigen Sieg auseinander, und zum Schluß heißt es:

„Zum Schluß bitten wir darauf hinweisen zu dürfen, daß wir bereit sind, eventuellen Käufern, bei denen durch die Ansprüche unserer Gegner irgendwelche Bedenken laut geworden sind, neben der von der Ford-Automobil-Gesellschaft bereits gewährten Deckung von Werten in Höhe von sechs Millionen Dollar eine von der Gesellschaft garantierte Obligation anzuweisen in der Höhe von weiteren sechs Millionen Dollar, so daß jeder einzelne Fordautobesitzer gedeckt sein wird, bis mindestens zwölf Millionen Obligationen von jenen vernichtet worden sind, die diese wunderbare Industrie zu beherrschen und zu monopolisieren wünschen.

Die Obligation steht Ihnen auf Verlangen sofort zur Verfügung; darum gestatten Sie es nicht, daß man Ihnen minderwertige Wagen zu extravaganten Preisen aufzwingt, ausschließlich auf Grund der Erklärungen dieser ehrenwerten Körperschaft.

NB. Der Kampf wird von der Ford-Automobil-Gesellschaft nicht ohne den Rat und Beistand der tüchtigsten Patentanwälte von Ost- und West-Amerika geführt.”

Wir glaubten, die Obligationen würden den Käufern Mut einflößen. Aber das war nicht der Fall. Wir verkauften über achtzehntausend Wagen — fast den doppelten Umsatz vom Jahre vorher — und ich glaube, rund fünfzig. Käufer verlangten die Obligation — vielleicht waren es auch weniger.

73

In Wahrheit hat vielleicht nichts so sehr dazu beigetragen, die Ford-Automobil-Gesellschaft bekannt zu machen, wie gerade dieser Prozeß. Wir erschienen ungerecht behandelt, und die Sympathien des Publikums waren auf unserer Seite. Die Vereinigung verfügte über siebzig Millionen Dollar — wir besaßen zu Anfang noch nicht einmal die Hälfte dieser Summe in Tausendern gerechnet. Ich war mir keinen Augenblick über den Ausgang im Zweifel; trotzdem war das Ganze ein Damoklesschwert, das ständig über unserm Haupte schwebte, und das wir recht gut hätten entbehren können. Jener Prozeß war wohl eine der kurzsichtigsten Handlungen, die von einer Gruppe amerikanischer Industrieller jemals begangen worden ist. Mit allen Streiflichtern, die darauf fielen, bietet er ein unübertroffenes Beispiel der Konsequenzen, die ein unbedachter Zusammenschluß zur Vernichtung eines Gewerbes nach sich ziehen kann. Ich betrachtete es als ein großes Glück für die amerikanische Automobilindustrie, daß wir Sieger blieben und daß die Vereinigung aufhörte, im Geschäftsleben eine wichtige Rolle zu spielen. 1908 waren wir trotz des Prozesses so weit gediehen, daß wir die von mir gewünschte Art von Wagen ankündigen und bauen lassen konnten.

74

 

 

____________________________

Version History & Notes

Version 1: Published Jul 31, 2015

__________________

Notes

* Cover image is not in the original document.

__________________

Knowledge is Power in Our Struggle for Racial Survival

(Information that should be shared with as many of our people as possible — do your part to counter Jewish control of the mainstream media — pass it on and spread the word) … Val Koinen at KOINEN’S CORNER

Note: This document is available at:

https://katana17.wordpress.com/

 

 

======================================

 

Klicken Sie hier um zu gehen auf >>>

Henry Ford — Teil 1: Vorwort des Herausgebers; Einleitung Mein Leitgedanke

Henry Ford — Teil 2: Geschäftsanfänge

Henry Ford — Teil 3: Was ich vom Geschäft erlernte

Henry Ford — Teil 4: Das eigentliche Geschäft beginnt

Henry Ford — Teil 5: Das Geheimnis der Produktion und des Dienens

Henry Ford — Teil 6: Die eigentliche Produktion beginnt

Henry Ford — Teil 7: Maschinen und Menschen

Henry Ford — Teil 8: Der Terror der Maschine

 

 

PDF of this postt. Click to view or download (1.0 MB). >> Henry Ford – Mein Leben Und Werk – Teil 4

 

Version History

 

 

 

Version 1: Jul 31, 2015

 

Read Full Post »

[This autobiography of Henry Ford describes the creation and building of the Ford Motor Company as well as his business philosophy. Ford was one of the world’s greatest industrialists, businessmen, entrepreneurs and visionaries. He introduced the assembly line, reduced working hours, introduced a high minimum wage, the five-day work week, etc., at the beginning of the 20th century. Ford was greatly admired by Adolf Hitler, the driving force behind National Socialism. In turn, Ford became an admirer of Hitler and equally shared his understanding of the menace the world faced with International jewry. — KATANA]

 

Henry Ford - My Life and Work - Cover Ver 2

[Click to enlarge]

 

My Life and Work

 

Henry Ford

 

 

Part 4 

 

IN  COLLABORATION  WITH

SAMUEL  CROWTHER

 

GARDEN CITY                       NEW YORK

DOUBLEDAY,  PAGE  &  COMPANY

 

1923

 

 

CONTENTS

 

 

 

Introduction — What is the Idea? ……………….……………… 1

Chapter I. The Beginning of Business ……………..….………. 21

Chapter II. What I Learned About Business ……………….. 33

Chapter III. Starting the Real Business …………..………….. 47

Chapter IV. The Secret of Manufacturing and Serving .. 64

Chapter V. Getting into Production ……………….…….……… 77

Chapter VI. Machines and Men …………………………..………. 91

Chapter VII. The Terror of the Machine ………….………….. 103

Chapter VIII. Wages …………………………………………..………. 116

Chapter IX. Why Not Always Have Good Business? ……..131

Chapter X. How Cheaply Can Things Be Made? …….……. 141

Chapter XI. Money and Goods …………………………..……….. 156

Chapter XII. Money — Master or Servant? ………….……… 169

Chapter XIII. Why Be Poor? ……………………………..……….. 184

Chapter XIV. The Tractor and Power Farming ..…….…… 195

Chapter XV. Why Charity? …………………………………………. 206

Chapter XVI. The Railroads ………………………………………… 222

Chapter XVII. Things in General ………………………..……….. 234

Chapter XVIII. Democracy and Industry ………..………….. 253

Chapter XIX. What We May Expect …………………..……….. 267

Index ……………………………………………………………..…..……… 285

 

 

 

Chapter III

 

Starting the Real Business

 

 

 

 

 

In the little brick shop at 81 Park Place I had ample opportunity to work out the design and some of the methods of manufacture of a new car. Even if it were possible to organize the exact kind of corporation that I wanted — one in which doing the work well and suiting the public would be controlling factors — it became apparent that I never could produce a thoroughly good motor car that might be sold at a low price under the existing cut-and-try manufacturing methods.

Everybody knows that it is always possible to do a thing better the second time. I do not know why manufacturing should not at that time have generally recognized this as a basic fact — unless it might be that the manufacturers were in such a hurry to obtain something to sell that they did not take time for adequate preparation. Making “to order” instead of making in volume is, I suppose, a habit, a tradition, that has descended from the old handicraft days. Ask a hundred people how they want a particular article made. About eighty will not know; they will leave it to you. Fifteen will think that they must say something, while five will really have preferences and reasons. The ninety-five, made up of those who do not know and admit it and the fifteen who do not know but do not admit it, constitute the real market for any product. The five who want something special may or may not be able to pay the price for special work. If they have the price, they can get the work, but they constitute a special and limited market. Of the ninety-five perhaps ten or fifteen will pay a price for quality.

[Page 48]

Of those remaining, a number will buy solely on price and without regard to quality. Their numbers are thinning with each day. Buyers are learning how to buy. The majority will consider quality and buy the biggest dollar’s worth of quality. If, therefore, you discover what will give this 95 per cent. of people the best all-round service and then arrange to manufacture at the very highest quality and sell at the very lowest price, you will be meeting a demand which is so large that it may be called universal.

This is not standardizing. The use of the word “standardizing” is very apt to lead one into trouble, for it implies a certain freezing of design and method and usually works out so that the manufacturer selects whatever article he can the most easily make and sell at the highest profit. The public is not considered either in the design or in the price. The thought behind most standardization is to be able to make a larger profit. The result is that with the economies which are inevitable if you make only one thing, a larger and larger profit is continually being had by the manufacturer. His output also becomes larger — his facilities produce more — and before he knows it his markets are overflowing with goods which will not sell. These goods would sell if the manufacturer would take a lower price for them. There is always buying power present — but that buying power will not always respond to reductions in price. If an article has been sold at too high a price and then, because of stagnant business, the price is suddenly cut, the response is sometimes most disappointing. And for a very good reason. The public is wary. It thinks that the price-cut is a fake and it sits around waiting for a real cut. We saw much of that last year. If, on the contrary, the economies of making are transferred at once to the price and if it is well known that such is the policy of the manufacturer, the public will have confidence in him and will respond.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

[Die Autobiographie von Henry Ford die Gründung und Bau der Ford Motor Company sowie seine Unternehmensphilosophie beschreiben. Ford war einer der weltweit größten Industriellen, Geschäftsleute, Unternehmer und Visionäre. Er führte das Fließband, Kurzarbeit, führte eine hohe Mindestlöhne, die Fünf-Tage-Woche, usw., zu Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts. Ford war stark von Adolf Hitler, die treibende Kraft hinter dem Nationalsozialismus zu bewundern. Im Gegenzug wurde Ford ein Bewunderer von Hitler und sein Verständnis für die Bedrohung der Welt mit dem internationalen Judentum konfrontiert zu gleichen Teilen getragen. — KATANA]

Henry Ford - Mein Leben Und Werk - Cover

[Klicken zum Vergrößern]

 

Mein Leben und Werk

 

Henry Ford

 

 

Teil 3 

 

Henry Ford - Mein Leben Und Werk - Portrait

 

 HENRY FORD

MEIN LEBEN UND WERK

EINZIG AUTORISIERTE DEUTSCHE AUSGABE

VON

CURT UND MARGUERITE THESING

ACHTZEHNTE AUFLAGE

PAUL LIST VERLAG LEIPZIG

DRUCK VON HESSE & BECKER, LEIPZIG

1923

 

 

INHALT

Seite

 

Vorwort des Herausgebers  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VI

Einleitung Mein Leitgedanke  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  1

I. Kapitel. Geschäftsanfänge  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . . . . . 25

II. Kapitel. Was ich vom Geschäft erlernte  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

III. Kapitel. Das eigentliche Geschäft beginnt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

IV. Kapitel. Das Geheimnis der Produktion und des Dienens . . . 74

V. Kapitel. Die eigentliche Produktion beginnt  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89

VI. Kapitel. Maschinen und Menschen  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . 106

VII. Kapitel. Der Terror der Maschine  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  120

VIII. Kapitel. Löhne  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135

IX. Kapitel. Warum nicht immer  gute Geschäfte machen?. . . . .153

X. Kapitel. Wie billig lassen sich Waren herstellen? . . . . . . . . . . 165

XI. Kapitel. Geld und Ware  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183

XII. Kapitel. Geld — Herr oder Knecht?  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198

XIII. Kapitel. Warum arm sein?  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .215

XIV. Kapitel. Der Schlepper und elektrisch

betriebene Landwirtschaft  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .228

XV. Kapitel. Warum Wohltätigkeit?  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242

XVI. Kapitel. Die Eisenbahnen  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260

XVII. Kapitel. Von allem Möglichen  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  274

XVIII. Kapitel. Demokratie und Industrie  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  296

XIX. Kapitel. Von künftigen Dingen  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312

VI

 

 

II. KAPITEL

 

 

WAS ICH VOM GESCHÄFT ERLERNTE

 

 

 

Mein ,,Benzinwägelchen“ war das erste und für lange Zeit auch das einzige Automobil in Detroit. Es galt allgemein als eine ziemliche Plage, da es viel Lärm machte und die Pferde erschreckte. Außerdem hemmte es den Verkehr. Ich konnte nirgends in der Stadt halten, ohne daß sich nicht augenblicklich eine Volksmenge um mein Wägelchen versammelte. Ließ ich es auch nur eine Minute allein, so fand sich sofort ein Neugieriger, der es zu fahren versuchte. Schließlich mußte ich ständig eine Kette bei mir tragen und es an einen Laternenpfahl anschließen, wenn ich es irgendwo stehen ließ. Dann gab es Scherereien mit der Polizei! Warum, weiß ich eigentlich nicht mehr, denn meiner Ansicht nach gab es damals doch keine Verordnungen über das Fahrtempo. Wie dem auch sei, ich mußte mir erst vom Bürgermeister einen besonderen Erlaubnisschein besorgen, und so genoß ich einige Zeit lang das Privileg, der einzige behördlich bestätigte Chauffeur Amerikas zu sein. In den Jahren 1896 und 1896 legte ich gul und gern meine 1600 Kilometer auf jener kleinen Maschine zurück, die ich dann für zweihundert Dollar an Charles Ainsley aus Detroit verkaufte. Das war mein erster Verkauf. Der Wagen war mir eigentlich nicht feil gewesen — ich hatte ihn lediglich für Versuchszwecke gebaut. Ich wollte aber mit einem neuen Wagen beginnen, und Ainsley wollte ihn haben. Ich konnte das Geld gebrauchen, und so waren wir uns denn bald über den Preis einig.

39

Ich hatte durchaus nicht die Absicht, in solch kleinem Maßstabe Automobile zu bauen. Mein Plan war vielmehr die Produktion im großen; vorerst mußte ich aber etwas  zum Produzieren haben. Es hat keinen Zweck, die Dinge zu überstürzen. 1896 begann ich mit dem Bau meines zweiten Wagens, der dem ersten sehr ähnlich, nur etwas leichter war. Den Riemen als Übersetzung hatte ich beibehalten, und ich ließ ihn auch erst viel später fallen. Riemen sind recht gut, außer bei heißem Wetter. Einzig aus diesem Grunde setzte ich später an seine Stelle ein richtiges Getriebe. Aus diesem Wagen zog ich manche gute Lehre.

Inzwischen hatten sich auch andere in Amerika und Europa an den Automobilbau herangemacht; schon iSgS erfuhr ich, daß ein deutscher Benzwagen bei Macy’s in Neuyork ausgestellt war. Ich fuhr eigens hin, um ihn mir anzusehen, aber er hatte nichts, was mir besonders auffiel. Auch der Benzwagen hatte einen Treibriemen, aber er war viel schwerer als der meinige. Ich legte besonders auf Gewichtsersparnis Wert, einen Vorteil, den die ausländischen Fabrikate niemals genug zu würdigen schienen. Alles in allem benutze ich in meiner Privatwerkstatt drei verschiedene Wagen, von denen jeder jahrelang in Detroit gefahren wurde. Ich besitze heute noch den ersten Wagen, den ich einige Jahre später für hundert Dollar von einem Manne zurückkaufte, an den Mr. Ainsley ihn verkauft hatte.

Während dieser ganzen Zeit behielt ich meine Stellung bei der Elektrizitätsgesellschaft bei und rückte allmählich zum ersten Ingenieur mit einem Monatsgehalt von I25 Dollar auf. Allein meine Experimente mit Gasmotoren erfreuten sich bei dem Direktor keiner größeren Beliebtheit als früher mein Hang zur Mechanik bei meinem Vater. Nicht etwa, daß mein Chef etwas gegen das Experimentieren an sich hatte — er war nur gegen Versuche mit Gasmotoren. Ich höre noch seine Worte: „Elektrizität, ja, das ist die kommende Sache. Aber Gas — — — nein!“

(more…)

Read Full Post »

[This autobiography of Henry Ford describes the creation and building of the Ford Motor Company as well as his business philosophy. Ford was one of the world’s greatest industrialists, businessmen, entrepreneurs and visionaries. He introduced the assembly line, reduced working hours, introduced a high minimum wage, the five-day work week, etc., at the beginning of the 20th century. Ford was greatly admired by Adolf Hitler, the driving force behind National Socialism. In turn, Ford became an admirer of Hitler and equally shared his understanding of the menace the world faced with International jewry. — KATANA]

 

Henry Ford - My Life and Work - Cover Ver 2

[Click to enlarge]

 

My Life and Work

 

Henry Ford

 

 

Part 3 

 

IN  COLLABORATION  WITH

SAMUEL  CROWTHER

 

GARDEN CITY                       NEW YORK

DOUBLEDAY,  PAGE  &  COMPANY

 

1923

 

 

CONTENTS

 

 

 

Introduction — What is the Idea? ……………….……………… 1

Chapter I. The Beginning of Business ……………..….………. 21

Chapter II. What I Learned About Business ……………….. 33

Chapter IIi. Starting the Real Business …………..………….. 47

Chapter IV. The Secret of Manufacturing and Serving .. 64

Chapter V. Getting into Production ……………….…….……… 77

Chapter VI. Machines and Men …………………………..………. 91

Chapter VII. The Terror of the Machine ………….………….. 103

Chapter VIII. Wages …………………………………………..………. 116

Chapter IX. Why Not Always Have Good Business? ……..131

Chapter X. How Cheaply Can Things Be Made? …….……. 141

Chapter XI. Money and Goods …………………………..……….. 156

Chapter XII. Money — Master or Servant? ………….……… 169

Chapter XIII. Why Be Poor? ……………………………..……….. 184

Chapter XIV. The Tractor and Power Farming ..…….…… 195

Chapter XV. Why Charity? …………………………………………. 206

Chapter XVI. The Railroads ………………………………………… 222

Chapter XVII. Things in General ………………………..……….. 234

Chapter XVIII. Democracy and Industry ………..………….. 253

Chapter XIX. What We May Expect …………………..……….. 267

Index ……………………………………………………………..…..……… 285

 

 

 

Chapter II

 

What I Learned About Business

 

 

 

 

My “gasoline buggy” was the first and for a long time the only automobile in Detroit. It was considered to be something of a nuisance, for it made a racket and it scared horses. Also it blocked traffic. For if I stopped my machine anywhere in town a crowd was around it before I could start up again. If I left it alone even for a minute some inquisitive person always tried to run it. Finally, I had to carry a chain and chain it to a lamp post whenever I left it anywhere. And then there was trouble with the police. I do not know quite why, for my impression is that there were no speed-limit laws in those days. Anyway, I had to get a special permit from the mayor and thus for a time enjoyed the distinction of being the only licensed chauffeur in America. I ran that machine about one thousand miles through 1895 and 1896 and then sold it to Charles Ainsley of Detroit for two hundred dollars. That was my first sale. I had built the car not to sell but only to experiment with. I wanted to start another car. Ainsley wanted to buy. I could use the money and we had no trouble in agreeing upon a price.

It was not at all my idea to make cars in any such petty fashion. I was looking ahead to production, but before that could come I had to have something to produce. It does not pay to hurry. I started a second car in 1896; it was much like the first but a little lighter. It also had the belt drive which I did not give up until some time later; the belts were all right excepting in hot weather. That is why I later adopted gears.

[Page 34]

I learned a great deal from that car. Others in this country and abroad were building cars by that time, and in 1895 I heard that a Benz car from Germany was on exhibition in Macy’s store in New York. I traveled down to look at it but it had no features that seemed worth while. It also had the belt drive, but it was much heavier than my car. I was working for lightness; the foreign makers have never seemed to appreciate what light weight means. I built three cars in all in my home shop and all of them ran for years in Detroit. I still have the first car; I bought it back a few years later from a man to whom Mr. Ainsley had sold it. I paid one hundred dollars for it.

During all this time I kept my position with the electric company and gradually advanced to chief engineer at a salary of one hundred and twenty-five dollars a month. But my gas-engine experiments were no more popular with the president of the company than my first mechanical leanings were with my father. It was not that my employer objected to experiments — only to experiments with a gas engine. I can still hear him say:

Electricity, yes, that’s the coming thing. But gas — no.

He had ample grounds for his skepticism — to use the mildest terms. Practically no one had the remotest notion of the future of the internal combustion engine, while we were just on the edge of the great electrical development. As with every comparatively new idea, electricity was expected to do much more than we even now have any indication that it can do. I did not see the use of experimenting with electricity for my purposes. A road car could not run on a trolley even if trolley wires had been less expensive; no storage battery was in sight of a weight that was practical. An electrical car had of necessity to be limited in radius and to contain a large amount of motive machinery in proportion to the power exerted.

[Page 35]

That is not to say that I held or now hold electricity cheaply; we have not yet begun to use electricity. But it has its place, and the internal combustion engine has its place. Neither can substitute for the other — which is exceedingly fortunate.

I have the dynamo that I first had charge of at the Detroit Edison Company. When I started our Canadian plant I bought it from an office building to which it had been sold by the electric company, had it revamped a little, and for several years it gave excellent service in the Canadian plant. When we had to build a new power plant, owing to the increase in business, I had the old motor taken out to my museum — a room out at Dearborn that holds a great number of my mechanical treasures.

There was no “demand” for automobiles — there never is for a new article.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

[Die Autobiographie von Henry Ford die Gründung und Bau der Ford Motor Company sowie seine Unternehmensphilosophie beschreiben. Ford war einer der weltweit größten Industriellen, Geschäftsleute, Unternehmer und Visionäre. Er führte das Fließband, Kurzarbeit, führte eine hohe Mindestlöhne, die Fünf-Tage-Woche, usw., zu Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts. Ford war stark von Adolf Hitler, die treibende Kraft hinter dem Nationalsozialismus zu bewundern. Im Gegenzug wurde Ford ein Bewunderer von Hitler und sein Verständnis für die Bedrohung der Welt mit dem internationalen Judentum konfrontiert zu gleichen Teilen getragen. — KATANA]

Henry Ford - Mein Leben Und Werk - Cover

[Klicken zum Vergrößern]

 

Mein Leben und Werk

 

Henry Ford

 

 

Teil 2 

 

Henry Ford - Mein Leben Und Werk - Portrait

 

 HENRY FORD

MEIN LEBEN UND WERK

EINZIG AUTORISIERTE DEUTSCHE AUSGABE

VON

CURT UND MARGUERITE THESING

ACHTZEHNTE AUFLAGE

PAUL LIST VERLAG LEIPZIG

DRUCK VON HESSE & BECKER, LEIPZIG

1923

 

 

INHALT

Seite

 

Vorwort des Herausgebers  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VI

Einleitung Mein Leitgedanke  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  1

I. Kapitel. Geschäftsanfänge  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . . . . . 25

II. Kapitel. Was ich vom Geschäft erlernte  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

III. Kapitel. Das eigentliche Geschäft beginnt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

IV. Kapitel. Das Geheimnis der Produktion und des Dienens . . . 74

V. Kapitel. Die eigentliche Produktion beginnt  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89

VI. Kapitel. Maschinen und Menschen  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . 106

VII. Kapitel. Der Terror der Maschine  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  120

VIII. Kapitel. Löhne  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135

IX. Kapitel. Warum nicht immer  gute Geschäfte machen?. . . . .153

X. Kapitel. Wie billig lassen sich Waren herstellen? . . . . . . . . . . 165

XI. Kapitel. Geld und Ware  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183

XII. Kapitel. Geld — Herr oder Knecht?  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198

XIII. Kapitel. Warum arm sein?  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .215

XIV. Kapitel. Der Schlepper und elektrisch

betriebene Landwirtschaft  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .228

XV. Kapitel. Warum Wohltätigkeit?  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242

XVI. Kapitel. Die Eisenbahnen  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260

XVII. Kapitel. Von allem Möglichen  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  274

XVIII. Kapitel. Demokratie und Industrie  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  296

XIX. Kapitel. Von künftigen Dingen  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312

VI

 

 

I. KAPITEL

 

 

GESCHÄFTSANFÄNGE

 

 

 

Am 31 Mai 1921 brachte die Ford-Automobil-Gesellschaft Wagen Nr. 5000000 heraus. Er steht jetzt in meinem Museum neben dem kleinen Benzinwägelchen, an dem ich meine Versuche begann, und das zum erstenmal im Frühjahr 1898 zu meiner Zufriedenheit lief. Ich fuhr den Wagen gerade, als die Reisstaare in Dearborn einzogen, und die kehren immer am 2. April zurück. Die beiden Wagen sind in ihrer äußeren Gestalt grundverschieden und in Bau und Material fast ebenso ungleich. Nur der Grundriß ist seltsamerweise fast unverändert bis auf einige Schnörkel, die wir an unsern modernen Wagen nicht wiederaufgenommen haben. Denn jenes kleine, alte Wägelchen lief, obwohl es jiur zwei Zylinder besaß, 82 Kilometer in der Stunde und hielt bei seinem Benzinbehälter von nur 12 Litern volle 100 Kilometer aus. Und auch heute noch ist es so gut wie am ersten Tage! Die Bauart hat sich eben weniger rasch entwickelt als die Herstellungstechnik und die Materialverwendung. Vervollkommnet hat sich natürlich auch diese; der heutige Ford-Wagen — ,,Modell T“ — hat vier Zylinder, einen Selbstanlasser und ist überhaupt in jeder Hinsicht ein bequemerer und praktischerer Wagen. Er ist einfacher als sein Vorgänger, aber fast jeder Teil ist bereits in dem Urbild enthalten. Die Änderungen verdanken wir unseren Erfahrungen in der Herstellung und keineswegs einem neuen Grundprinzip — , woraus ich die wichtige Lehre ziehe, daß es besser ist, alle Kraft einzusetzen, eine gute Idee zu vervollkommnen, statt anderen, neuen Ideen nachzujagen. Eine gute Idee bietet gerade so viel, als man auf einmal bewältigen kann.

26

Das Farmerleben trieb mich dazu, neue und bessere Transportmittel zu erfinden. Ich wurde am 30. Juli 1860 auf einer Farm bei Diarborn in Michigan geboren, und die ersten Eindrücke, deren ich mich entsinnen kann, waren, daß es dort, an den Resultaten gemessen, viel zu viel Arbeit gab. Auch heute habe ich in bezug auf das Farmerleben noch das gleiche Gefühl.

Es geht die Sage, daß meine Eltern sehr arm waren und es schwer hatten. Sie waren zwar nicht reich, aber von wirklicher Armut konnte nicht die Rede sein. Für Michigan Farmer waren sie sogar wohlhabend. Mein Geburtshaus steht noch und gehört mitsamt der Farm zu meinen Liegenschaften.

Auf unserer wie auf anderen Farmen gab es damals zuviel schwere Handarbeit. Schon in meiner frühesten Jugend glaubte ich, daß sich vieles irgendwie auf eine bessere Art verrichten ließe. Darum wandte ich mich der Technik zu — wie auch meine Mutter von jeher behauptete, ich sei der geborene Techniker. Ich besaß eine Werkstatt mit allen möglichen Metallteilen an Stelle von Werkzeugen, bevor ich noch etwas anderes mein eigen nennen konnte. Zu jener Zeit gab es noch kein neumodisches Spielzeug: was wir hatten, war selbst gefertigt. Meine Spielsachen waren Werkzeuge — wie auch heute noch. Jedes Stück einer Maschine war für mich ein Schatz.

Das wichtigste Ereignis jener Knaben jähre war mein Zusammentreffen mit einer Lokomobile etwa zwölf Kilometer von Detroit, als wir eines Tages zur Stadt fuhren. Ich waidamals zwölf Jahre alt. Das zweitwichtigste Ereignis, das noch in das gleiche Jahr fiel, war das Geschenk einer Uhr.

Ich kann mich an die Maschine erinnern, als wäre es gestern; war sie doch das erste nicht von Pferden gezogene Fahrzeug, das ich in meinem Leben zu Gesicht bekam, Sie war in der Hauptsache dazu bestimmt, Dreschmaschinen und Sägewerke zu treiben und bestand aus einer primitiven fahrbaren Maschine mit Kessel und einem hinten an gekoppelten Wasserbehälter und Kohlenkarren.

27

Zwar hatte ich schon viele von Pferden gezogene Lokomobilen gesehen: diese jedoch hatte eine Verbindungskette zu den Hinterrädern des w^agenähnlichen Gestells, das den Kessel trug.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

[This autobiography of Henry Ford describes the creation and building of the Ford Motor Company as well as his business philosophy. Ford was one of the world’s greatest industrialists, businessmen, entrepreneurs and visionaries. He introduced the assembly line, reduced working hours, introduced a high minimum wage, the five-day work week, etc., at the beginning of the 20th century. Ford was greatly admired by Adolf Hitler, the driving force behind National Socialism. In turn, Ford became an admirer of Hitler and equally shared his understanding of the menace the world faced with International jewry. — KATANA]

 

Henry Ford - My Life and Work - Cover Ver 2

[Click to enlarge]

 

My Life and Work

 

Henry Ford

 

 

Part 2 

 

IN  COLLABORATION  WITH

SAMUEL  CROWTHER

 

GARDEN CITY                       NEW YORK

DOUBLEDAY,  PAGE  &  COMPANY

 

1923

 

 

CONTENTS

 

 

 

Introduction — What is the Idea? ……………….……………… 1

Chapter I. The Beginning of Business ……………..….………. 21

Chapter II. What I Learned About Business ……………….. 33

Chapter IIi. Starting the Real Business …………..………….. 47

Chapter IV. The Secret of Manufacturing and Serving .. 64

Chapter V. Getting into Production ……………….…….……… 77

Chapter VI. Machines and Men …………………………..………. 91

Chapter VII. The Terror of the Machine ………….………….. 103

Chapter VIII. Wages …………………………………………..………. 116

Chapter IX. Why Not Always Have Good Business? ……..131

Chapter X. How Cheaply Can Things Be Made? …….……. 141

Chapter XI. Money and Goods …………………………..……….. 156

Chapter XII. Money — Master or Servant? ………….……… 169

Chapter XIII. Why Be Poor? ……………………………..……….. 184

Chapter XIV. The Tractor and Power Farming ..…….…… 195

Chapter XV. Why Charity? …………………………………………. 206

Chapter XVI. The Railroads ………………………………………… 222

Chapter XVII. Things in General ………………………..……….. 234

Chapter XVIII. Democracy and Industry ………..………….. 253

Chapter XIX. What We May Expect …………………..……….. 267

Index ……………………………………………………………..…..……… 285

 

 

 

Chapter 1

 

The Beginning of Business

 

 

 

On May 31, 1921, the Ford Motor Company turned out Car No. 5,000,000. It is out in my museum along with the gasoline buggy that I began work on thirty years before and which first ran satisfactorily along in the spring of 1893. I was running it when the bobolinks came to Dearborn and they always come on April 2nd.

There is all the difference in the world in the appearance of the two vehicles and almost as much difference in construction and materials, but in fundamentals the two are curiously alike — except that the old buggy has on it a few wrinkles that we have not yet quite adopted in our modern car. For that first car or buggy, even though it had but two cylinders, would make twenty miles an hour and run sixty miles on the three gallons of gas the little tank held and is as good to-day as the day it was built. The development in methods of manufacture and in materials has been greater than the development in basic design. The whole design has been refined; the present Ford car, which is the “Model T,” has four cylinders and a self starter — it is in every way a more convenient and an easier riding car. It is simpler than the first car. But almost every point in it may be found also in the first car. The changes have been brought about through experience in the making and not through any change in the basic principle — which I take to be an important fact demonstrating that, given a good idea to start with, it is better to concentrate on perfecting it than to hunt around for a new idea. One idea at a time is about as much as any one can handle.

[Page 22]

It was life on the farm that drove me into devising ways and means to better transportation. I was born on July 30, 1863, on a farm at Dearborn, Michigan, and my earliest recollection is that, considering the results, there was too much work on the place. That is the way I still feel about farming. There is a legend that my parents were very poor and that the early days were hard ones. Certainly they were not rich, but neither were they poor. As Michigan farmers went, we were prosperous. The house in which I was born is still standing, and it and the farm are part of my present holding.

 

My toys were all tools — they still are! And every fragment of machinery was a treasure.”

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »